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20121101
20121130
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. the launch pad for peace may be in cairo. in the last 24 hours egypt has been mediating high-stakes discussions between israeli and hamas leaders. speaking today egyptian prime minister hish m kandil said -- in gaza, palestinian medical officials report 95 people have been killed in gaza including 23 children. for the second straight day, israel bombed a building housing local and international media. the target of the attack was a commanding member of an islamic jihad group who also had an apartment in the building. meanwhile, hamas continues to send rockets deep into israel. last night, israel's iron dome intercepted two rockets headed for tel aviv. yesterday, israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu had tough talks on twitter writing we are exacting a heavy price from hamas and the terrorist organizations. the idf is prepared for a significant expansion of its operation. in a press gaggle on route to cambodia this morning, deputy national security adviser ben rhodes says the white house's goal is to have nations with influence in the region speak for deescalation. speakin
for what could be another night of deadly attacks despite the diplomatic activity in cairo. negotiations are under way as well as palestinian factions as to what to do next, but those here in gaza say they are preparing for a ground invasion, and meaning if israel launches a war, they will fight and they are prepared to defend their territory as they say and on the same side israelis say they have finalized preparation for a ground invasion and now it is a matter of a political decision, and certainly something that everybody in cairo is trying to avert, but one that everybody here thinks it is not going to be averted any time soon. thomas? >> well, you talk about the diplomatic conversations in cairo, and what is on the table? what terms are being discussed? >> well, two central issues from the two perspectives. the head of the hamas today held a press conference in which he highlighted hamas position, and that is simple in their eyes, israel must stop all hostilities against the leadership and assassinating and killing key palestinian figures and call on the international community to
is in cairo. but we begin in gaza. this truce was marked by a huge celebration there in gaza today. tell us about it. >> that's true. in fact, tens of thousands of palestinians showed up in gaza city. and actually in cities all across the gaza strip to hear from various leaders of all of the palestinian factions. the biggest one was by far and large in gaza city. some leaders we haven't heard in the past eight days, many in hiding, came out today to address the thousands of people who gathered. they're portraying this and describing this as a victory. they say for the first time hamas has not only defeated israel, but has also shown the world what they're about against a back drop of changes taking place all across the arab world. they also sent a message to the united states saying that they should, the united states should support the palestinian people and not the occupation. hamas was going to remain defiant in the face of israel's aggression on its people. alex? >> okay. thank you very much for the latest from gaza. we go from there to israel. nbc's martin fletcher is standing by in te
to what had just transpired hours before in cairo. >> now sparking a war of words with the president, senators are threatening to block her potential nomination as secretary of state. >> the reason i don't trust her is because i think she knew better, and if she didn't know better, she shouldn't be the voice of america. >> senator mccain and senator graham and others want to go after somebody, they should go after me. >> we'll talk to senator lindsey graham exclusively this morning. >>> plus, the key figures trying to get to the bottom of benghazi and the petraeus affair. chair of the senate intelligence committee senator dianne feinstein of california. and chair of the house intelligence committee, congressman mike rogers of michigan. >>> then after the election, will washington get anything done? talks start on how to avoid the fiscal cliff, as mitt romney draws fire from fellow republicans by accusing the president of doling out, quote, gifts to minority groups in exchange for their vote. what's the fallout and the future of the gop? with us, tea-party backed congressman raul labr
to meet with leaders in jerusalem as well as cairo and ramallah. few details have been provided in a news conference an hour ago. >> we are all hoping for a deescalation and we are all hoping for restoration of calm, and we are all hoping to open space, for deeper, broader conversations. >> now, the death and the destruction caused by the crisis stretches across both borders. more than 100 confirmed killed in gaza. four in israel including an israeli soldier who died in a rocket strike today. we want to get more from nbc correspondent, ayman mohyeldin, who joins me from gaza. you reached out to the egyptian authorities about what's taking place, when this deal will be announced. what are you hearing about the possibility of that happening this hour? >> well, right now what we're hearing from egyptian officials is that they're still working to finalize that agreement. there are some areas where the gap between the two sides has been narrowed, but there are still some very important issues that have not been addressed. you know, we are talking about trying to solve one of the most complex i
me from cairo, nbc news correspondent jim maceda. jim, explain to all of us the reaction to secretary clinton's visit to the region and the impact that her presence has brought to the negotiations for a cease-fire. >> reporter: first, the reaction has been one of anxiety, anticipation, and of deep hope that secretary of state hillary clinton can now broker or help to broke err deal. they certainly don't want war right next door. many are asking where america has been for these past eight or so years. i think the overall feeling is one of anticipation, that something hopefully now can move forward. in terms of her impact today, she's met already with president morsi. she's also wrapping up a meeting with the foreign minister and we understand at the press conference she's supposed to give has not started yet. but i can guarantee you that many people here in egypt and israel are intent on following that press conference. unlike yesterday, there have been no dramatic statements that a cease-fire will be declared at such and such a time. today it's more the reality of both sides, israel a
to broker the cease. jim is joining us from cairo. this was seen as a test of the relations following the arab spring, so how did it do? >> reporter: morsi has passed the test as ayman and martin suggested, this is the middle east and there's not a lot of optimism. we'll see how morsi chooses. there may be a moment of truth where he has to decide between hamas or with the truce. we don't know how he'll do that or which way he'll go, but so far it's pretty amazing to see this man who was not even a muslim brotherhood's main candidate for president. he was the backup plan now receiving the praises of everyone yesterday from hamas to benjamin netanyahu, clinton, president obama, everyone had good things to say about morsi who is emerging as a pragmatic guy and politician but as a regional star. hillary clinton spent hours with morsi and his foreign minister talking about stopping the hostilities and negotiating everything else later. this time with morsi as the mediator, today in "the new york times" you can actually see the turnaround in president obama's thinking about morsi. it starte
is live for us in cairo. jim, good day to you there in cairo. what's going on this morning? >> hi there, alex. it's kind of a festive atmosphere down below me there on tahrir square. several hundred people chanting, marching, but the flag -- the tents are out. some of the stands are out. the tea man is out. it's a bit reminiscent of how it was almost now two years ago. and egyptians, you know, seem more divided than ever, alex. for many here their elected leaders -- or i should say the elected leader morsi himself has just driven a wedge deeper and even wider. at dawn there were more tents than protesters on tahrir square. ground zero for last year's uprising. but that didn't stop clashes with police on approach roads where protesters blocked traffic, defying president mohamed morsi's orders. after morsi declared sweeping powers for himself, leaving him above the law. "we are here because the goals of the revolution have yet to be achieved" said this protester. morsi told the supporters he had to take radical measures to protect the revolution. and fast-track a new constitution being wr
. and a big name governor says he's in. clashes in cairo as egypt's president continues to push the limits of his power. but first today's trivia question. who holds the record as both the youngest and the oldest governor ever in his state's history? wanna see me get some great deals? ok! it's a new way to get cash back deals and it's called bankamerideals. i sign in to my online banking... click the "cash back deals" tab... and pick the deals i want. i just use my bank of america debit or credit card when i pay. and then i get up to 15% cash back... put into my account! i know, right? [ male announcer ] introducing bankamerideals, free for online banking customers. sign in to your online banking to choose your deals today. free for online banking customers. is bigger than we think ... sometimelike the flu.fer from with aches, fever and chills- the flu's a really big deal. so why treat it like it's a little cold? there's something that works differently than over-the-counter remedies. prescription tamiflu attacks the flu virus at its source. so don't wait. call your doctor right away. tami
in jerusalem. palestinian authorities in ramallah and later travel to cairo where officials are said to be proposing for a truce. >>> egyptian president mohamed morsi is seen as a critical player. he met yesterday with u.n. secretary ban ki-moon. turkey's prime minister complicated matters when he reefr referred to israel as a terrorist state after attending talks in egypt. president obama spoke by phone yesterday to both morsi and netanyahu during his trip to southeast asia. in gaza hamas is calling for israel to stop killing its leaders and end a six-year blockade. meanwhile, new explosions continued through palestinian territory. they say they targeted the national islamic bank which they accuse hamas of using to pay its employees. an nbc analysis found israel has killed nearly 40 hamas militants over the last week, often using high precision drone strikes but the civilian toll has been high as well. thousands of people turned out for the funerals of four young children killed in an israeli air strike. meanwhile, israel's so-called iron dome missile defense has helped keep most mi
not responded to the reports. >>> overseas tens of thousands are rallying today in cairo's tahrir square protesting what they view as a blatant power grab by president mohamed horsey. with tensions mounting yesterday, morsi appeared to soften his controversial attempt to award himself near absolute power above the reach of the law. in a vaguely worded statement, morsi spokesman backtracked slightly saying that only acts of sovereignty would be immune from oversight. >>> well, u.s. consumers went big this weekend for small business saturday. millions of holiday shoppers spent a total of $5.5 billion during the third annual local business shopping event. mika spent half of that in the south of france. and that's not even counted in that tally. for more on the holiday shopping season and the impact on the economy, let's go right now to cnbc's steve sedwood live in london with us. steve, what's it looking like over there? >> it's looking pretty good. i haven't even started my holiday season shopping. i'll leave that right till the last moment. what is really fascinating is every single surve
-fire for israel and hamas. any details have yet to be worked out. the next direct talks happen in k cairo. meanwhile, the military is not commenting on the long oh-range rockets, the same type that were fired into israel. hamas says the can conflict caused $1.2 billion to the economy. >>> in egypt, dueling rallies are planned. police and protesters are planned at tahrir square. jim maceda is live in cairo. can you put a perspective on this? i understand there are going to be demonstrations from both sides. >> that's absolutely right. i'll tell you, alex, you won't see many of them down below me here in tahrir square, nor will you see them throwing rocks at the police. but the average egyptians, since there's no polling on this, they are just as worried and angry about what morsi has done. morsi in putting his own will, his own voice above the wall, that he's, in fact, snuffing out the will of the people and all those other voices of egyptians who are not muslim brotherhood. many egyptians were killed down below and up to 11 thour,000, i understand, wounded since the uprising, did that in
this is the epicenter of the violence that is taking place, all eyes are in cairo, egypt. the head of egypt's intelligence has met with lead others palestinian factions. they say they're committed to a ceasefire under two conditions. one is that israel promises or at least pledges or guarantees that it will not resume targeted assassination and the deliberate killing of palestinian leaders and a lifting of the blockade and siege that has been imposed on gaza since 2006, which has restricted the free movement of people and goods and has really created a humanitarian crisis here. so they want to see that siege lifted. the egyptian, we understand, are expected to or may have actually communicated that to the israelis. and so it is now dependent on whether or not they can get the two sides to a cessation of hostilities, and when that time frame would unfold. so there is still no clear official timeline or clear answer, and no clear commitment from either side. but those interest demands as we understand them as they are being negotiated from the palestinian side. >> all right. live in gaza, tha
israel's goals are and again when she goes to cairo and meets with president morsi, which is arguably the most important stop on this trip. >> because he's the mediator. >> and president obama has developed a very interesting relationship over the past -- >> i think we have to hold onto morsi. >> -- with the president of egypt. >> don't you? >> absolutely. >> last word, steve. how important -- >> let's be clear -- >> always had the deal between israel and egypt in the interest of both countries and our country. can we keep that deal? is there some architecture for peace there? >> we're going to try to keep that deal absolutely, but, remember, we're complicit in part of what happened. obama when he took george mitchell's resignation and basically moved dennis ross out of the white house, he doesn't put a new program on the table. and when america walks away from this peace process or an effort to bring the two sides together and really lay out a plan, violence kicks up. so we have a bit of complicity, and you are seeing right now not a strategic presidency from obama but a reactive pre
in cairo today, during which he said that while his side agrees to the cease-fire, his fighters have, quote, their hands on the trigger. in jerusalem, the israeli prime minister, benjamin net ya yan hew, also spoke about the cease-fire agreement. look at this. "prime minister benjamin netanyahu this evening spoke with u.s. president barack obama and acceded to his recommendation to give the egyptian cease-fire proposal a chance." he acceded to what president obama wanted. in other words, this is the american's idea, not mine, but i'm going to go along with it, because they're advising me i ought. it's very specific language, highlighting how central the united states is and what's happening right now, but also, sort of distancing israel from the cease-fire. making it our american cease-fire and not theirs. the most important thing tonight for people who are living in range of the rockets and the air strikes is that, of course, the cease-fire appears to be holding, at least for tonight. in terms of how likely it is to hold and whether it has created room for more robust hope of ongoing peace
in cairo. i want to start there. we have "new york times" columnist david brooks and our own andrea mitchell. andrea, this is because president morsi has seized power, a day after brokering a cease-fire between israel and hamas, he is now consolidating power. how worry side the administration about it? >> very worried, but they are very, very cautious because he is their new point of leverage really with hamas. he is the future, they thought, of trying to negotiate something and revive the israeli-palestinian talks. and now suddenly he seizes power. he was looking for this opportunity. he is threatened by the judiciary and the other mubarak forces who have, he believes, stopped the constitutional process and stymied that. but for him to do this now, at his point of greatest authority, puts the administration in a bind. and it's unclear how this is going to resolve. >> david brooks, there's a larger strategic question. there's egypt, gaza, syria, iran. there's a president's second term that's got to be dominated by this region. >> i think so. it's the middle east, so there's good new
. 180 metro areas have jobless rates below 7%. outside the u.s. protesters jammed cairo protesting a decree by president morsi. now back to "hardball." >>> back to "hardball." u.s. congressman tom cole of oklahoma signaled republicans should accept president obama's tax offer. earlier today the president made note of it. let's listen. >> i'm glad to see, if you've been reading the papers lately, that more and more republicans in congress seem to be agreeing with this idea that we should have a balanced approach. so, if both parties agree we should not raise taxes on middle class families, let's begin our work with where we agree. >> congressman, thank you for joining us tonight. give us your thinking about why it's important, i know politically it makes sense to many people, middle class, people making up to $250,000 a year, get the tax cut continued but people above are basically decoupled from that much larger group of people. >> well, chris, i don't think taxes ought to go up for anybody. i think it's bad economic policy. it will eventually cost us jobs and eventually slow the e
in cairo. they may be temporary. they may be very, very limited and they may never materialize at all. what hamas has gained is, first of all, a certain diplomatic breakthrough. while it was going on, the prime minister of egypt went there, the foreign minister of turkey went there. what hamas has been able to do is -- >> international recognition. >> yeah. break out of its diplomatic cage a bit. that's the benefit. the other thing, this is a benefit to the people, the hamas people in gaza, fighting an internal power with the external leadership that used to be in damascus and is now dispursed all over the place. they achieved things for themselves. the people of gaza maybe in a sense of euphoria, but there's a sense of hangover. there ought to be, as there was, after cass led in 2008 and 2009, a clear contrast with a better situation. today there isn't one. that's the tragedy. that means hamas might be able to spin this into a long term political benefit for themselves. >> the counter argument to what i made is would you rather live in gaza or the west bank. >> it's still the west bank, bu
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18